Lyndale Avenue Retrofit

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Consultation has concluded

Logo of Lyndale Avenue Retrofit

Lyndale Avenue is one of Bloomington’s original and oldest commercial corridors. It serves the entire City; but also functions as a neighborhood “main street” to many residents, businesses, and employers. Lyndale Avenue continues to thrive, although it is aging and is not realizing its full potential. Revitalization will help Lyndale Avenue to meet changing community needs and ensure future economic sustainability.

The City of Bloomington, in partnership with Hennepin County and Stantec Consulting Services, has been working to define a clear vision and strategy to attract reinvestment and new development in the Lyndale Corridor (generally I-494 to 98th Street). The

Lyndale Avenue is one of Bloomington’s original and oldest commercial corridors. It serves the entire City; but also functions as a neighborhood “main street” to many residents, businesses, and employers. Lyndale Avenue continues to thrive, although it is aging and is not realizing its full potential. Revitalization will help Lyndale Avenue to meet changing community needs and ensure future economic sustainability.

The City of Bloomington, in partnership with Hennepin County and Stantec Consulting Services, has been working to define a clear vision and strategy to attract reinvestment and new development in the Lyndale Corridor (generally I-494 to 98th Street). The goal is to transform this auto-oriented street into a walkable and multi-use corridor. This will take time and involve continued input from the community and neighborhood property and business owners. The Lyndale Avenue Retrofit strategy will build on the corridor’s main assets: jobs, adjacent residential neighborhoods, and the existing mix of businesses.


The strategy identifies opportunities for public and private investment, providing a variety of housing and mobility options, attractive and accessible public spaces, and active commercial areas to serve residents, employees, and visitors.


Public engagement has been an essential part of the process. Early in the study, area business owners, artists, residents, and City officials provided input, and guidance to shape the plan. Interactive workshops and events held at schools and locations around the area gave youth and other community members a chance to offer ideas. This input helped define a vision for the future of the Lyndale Avenue Corridor.

Draft Plan

The full draft plan is available for review here:Lyndale Avenue Retrofit Plan.pdf

Individual sections are posted below:

Concept drawings prepared for the areas around 98th and 86th streets depict how these areas might redevelop over the next 20+ years. The ideas presented in the concepts reflect the consultant’s market analysis findings and community feedback.

Click here to open a larger map of the project concepts.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

To me it seems like you are putting the cart before the horse....You are trying to make this more transit and less auto friendly before there are transit options to get me there. I have seen the city do project after project forcing pedestrian transit friendly designs but I have seen no improvement in over a decade in transit options. For me, the bus service within a 2.5 miles is express service to downtown Mpls. Nothing that would get me to local shopping/entertainment or employment opportunities.

Dale 7 months ago

NOT IN FAVOR

Dhruska123 7 months ago

One of the two stoplights on 98th Street - either Garfield or Grand - should be eliminated. This is a high traffic area, and the constant stop-and-go nature creates a significant amount of car exhaust & wastes gas. Even electric vehicles perform poorly in constant stop-and-go environments. Eliminating one stoplight (preferably eliminating the Garfield & 98th light) increases the development's sustainability & helps reduce its environmental impact.

ussohio 8 months ago